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Six Star N.O. Fury Review

N.O. Fury

N.O. Fury is one of Six Star Pro Nutrition’s pre-workouts which contains some pretty standard ingredients, with Caffeine being the only stimulant…

N.O. Fury is one of Six Star Pro Nutrition’s pre-workouts which contains some pretty standard ingredients, with Caffeine being the only stimulant…

SKIP TO THE BOTTOM LINE

Creatine

Creatine is the most extensively studied ergogenic aid currently available, and by far one of the most effective at increasing both strength and muscle mass. Its primary mechanism of action is its ability to rapidly produce Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) to support cellular energy, thereby directly increasing strength and power output.

Additionally, during high intensity exercise, Creatine is used for energy which tends to spare the glycogen that would normally be used. Since lactic acid is a by-product created when glucose is burned for energy, Creatine may also indirectly reduce lactic acid build-up which poses a secondary mechanism by which Creatine can potentially enhance performance.

Creatine Monohydrate is the most commonly recommended form of Creatine because its cheap and works as well as any other form.  Six Star doesn’t disclose the exact dose of Creatine Monohydrate in N.O. Fury but we know that 1 serving contains 2.5g of Creatine Monohydrate and Creatine HCL, combined.

Given that both forms are about equal in terms of efficacy, it doesn’t really matter how much of each there is.  At two servings, N.O. Fury yields a clinical dose of Creatine which will increase strength and muscle mass if taken regularly for several weeks.

Glycine

Glycine is the simplest of all amino acids but, aside from contributing to the formation of proteins, it has no innate muscle-building properties.  Six Star may have tossed Glycine in the N.O. Fury formula as a “filler” ingredient since it is inexpensive and slightly sweet tasting.

BCAAs

The term “Branched Chain Amino Acids” (BCAAs) refers to the amino acids Leucine, Isoleucine, and Valine which are commonly utilized together in a 2:1:1 ratio (Leucine, Isoleucine, Valine). While Leucine does appear to be the most critical in regards to muscle protein synthesis, a 2009 study published in the “Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition” concluded thatBCAAs (2:1:1) have a more pronounced effect on protein synthesis than the same amount of Leucine alone, indicating that all three is the best way to go.

Unfortunately, N.O. Fury contains an extremely low (and therefore ineffective) dose of BCAAs given a proprietary blend weight of only 1.5g, with Glycine coming first.  Even at 2 servings it still wouldn’t be much.

Taurine

Taurine has been shown to reduce exercise-induced oxidative muscle damage in multiple studies.  While these findings certainly implicate Taurine as a recovery aid, it may also enhance exercise performance.

A recent 2013 study, also from “Amino Acids” noted a 1.7% improvement in 3k-time trial of runners after supplementing with Taurine, and these findings were further corroborated in a later 2013 study from “Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism”  in which Taurine supplementation was able to increase strength as well as decrease oxidative muscle damage in human subjects.

N.O. Fury contains 1.5g of Taurine per serving, a moderately effective dose as far as the performance enhancement/recovery benefits are concerned.

Citrulline Malate

Citrulline is an amino acid which serves as a precursor to Arginine, and therefore is directly involved in the production of Nitric Oxide.  Unlike supplemental Arginine, however, Citrulline is quite reliable at increasing plasma Arginine and ultimately enhancing performance.

Citrulline has been shown to increase muscular contraction efficiency, meaning less ATP is required for a given workload.  This mechanism explains why subjects who consumed Citrulline were able to perform more reps later on in the workout compared to subjects who consumed a placebo.

Additionally, Citrulline has been shown to reduce muscle soreness effectively making it both a performance enhancing ingredient as well a recovery agent.

Unfortunately, N.O. Fury doesn’t contain anywhere near a clinical dose of Citrulline.  At 1g per serving, users would need 6 servings to achieve a clinical dose.

Caffeine Anhydrous

Caffeine is a well-established ergogenic aid, oral consumption of which triggers the release of Catcholamines (Noradrenaline, Dopamine, Adrenaline, etc.), generally inducing a state of increased alertness, focus, and perceived energy.

Additionally, Caffeine can enhance calcium-ion release in muscle tissue, which directly increases muscle contraction force. Rather than discuss dozens of studies, we’ll leave it at this: Caffeine is an extremely effective ergogenic aid, though tolerance build-up is certainly an issue to keep in mind.

N.O. Fury contains 185mg of Caffeine per serving, enough for the average (not Caffeine tolerant) individual to feel more alert and focused, but the hardcore stim-lovers may be disappointed.

The Bottom Line

At two servings, N.O. Fury may enhance energy/focus and increase strength/endurance over time, but at one serving it can hardly be considered effective, let alone competitive.  With so many clinically-dosed, more economical pre-workouts out there, we just can’t recommend going with N.O. Fury.

Still don’t know which pre-workout supplement is right for you?  Take a look at our Top 10 Pre-Workout Supplements List!

REFERENCES
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