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High T Black Review

High T Black

High T Black is one of KingFisher’s alternatives to the original test-booster, High T. The core “test-boosting” ingredients are roughly the same, but additional ingredients such as Raspberry Ketone, Citrulline, and Beta-Alanine have been added…

 

High T Black is one of KingFisher’s alternatives to the original test-booster, High T. The core “test-boosting” ingredients are roughly the same, but additional ingredients such as Raspberry Ketone, Citrulline, and Beta-Alanine have been added…[Skip to the Bottom Line]

RASPBERRY KETONE:

Despite the popularity of Raspberry Ketone, it has never actually demonstrated any efficacy for weight-loss in actual humans and, even in rat studies, has produced lackluster results using massive concentrations.

A 2010 in vitro study found that treatment with Raspberry Ketone increased fatty acid oxidation and lipolysis in adipocytes (fat cells). However, the amount/concentration of RK used in this study is beyond what could practically be consumed in oral supplement form.

A 2005 study, seeking to determine the weight loss effects of raspberry ketone on rats fed a high fat diet, noted dose dependent anti-obesity effects using doses of .5-4 grams/kg. This would roughly correspond to a 150lb person consuming 34-130 grams daily, a highly impractical dose.

In a 2012 study, similar effects were observed in rats, though this time with a focus on fat accumulation in the liver resulting from a high fat diet. The only human study that exists grouped Raspberry Ketone in with several other popular weight-loss ingredients so the effects cannot be attributed to raspberry ketones alone.

On a molecular level, Raspberry Ketone certainly demonstrates anti-obesity effects, but the doses used to achieve these effects are far more than what the average human could practically consume.

High T Black contains 200mg of Raspberry Ketone which, despite being about double what we usually see, is still far less than the concentration required to actually burn a significant amount of fat.

FENUGREEK SEED EXTRACT (50% SAPONINS):

While Fenugreek (as Testofen) has demonstrated the ability to increase Testosterone in one study, it has failed to do so elsewhere under similar conditions. We discuss Fenugreek and its effects on Testosterone in depth in this article.

At this time, the reason for the discrepancy is unknown. So, as a Test-booster, the reliability of Fenugreek should be questioned. Like Tribulus, Fenugreek is an effective libido enhancer and may provide the illusion of increased Testosterone regardless of whether an actual increase occurs.

KingFisher does not disclose the exact dose of Fenugreek in High T Black but, given that it leads a 900mg proprietary blend with three other ingredients, we estimate 300-500mg. Fenugreek is the only ingredient in High T Black that has been shown to outright increase Testosterone levels in healthy individuals, but these effects appear somewhat unreliable.

EURYCOMA LONGIFOLIA:

Eurycoma Longifolia, also known as Tongkat Ali has been shown, in various studies, to increase Testosterone in male rats, but the only human studies that exist have tested the effects of Tongkat Ali in infertile men, not healthy men.

A 2010 study published in the “Asian Journal of Andrology” found that supplementation with 200mg of an extract of Eurycoma Longifolia significantly improved various indications of male fertility (in humans), though the mechanism of action was unknown.

A 2012 study published in “Andrologia: Volume 44” (the same researchers from the above mentioned human study) found that men suffering from Hypogonadism (diminishing functionality of the gonads) who were treated with a 200 mg daily dose of Eurycoma longifolia extract reached normal Testosterone levels after a 30 day period. To be fair, at the start of the study about 35% of the men were showing normal Testosterone levels, and at the end about 90% showed normal levels. Still, 35% to 90% is clearly statistically significant.

Eurycoma longifolia is listed second in the High T Black propretiary blend, so there is certainly room for an effective (200mg) dose, though we cannot be certain because KingFisher does not tell us exactly how much there is.

RHODIOLA ROSEA ROOT EXTRACT, (STD. MIN. 3% ROSAVINS):

Rhodiola Rosea has a long history of use as an adaptogen, meaning it can decrease the body’s sensitivity to stressful situations, physical or mental. Preliminary studies in animals have shown that Rhodiola Rosea produces anabolic effects similar to low dose testosterone treatment.

One human trial, to determine a possible role in erectile dysfunction, found that subjects who consumed 150-200mg Rhodiola Rosea daily for three months experienced heightened sexual function. Whether this was a direct result of increased testosterone is unknown, but given the preliminary support from the animal studies, it is certainly a possibility.

It’s not clear whether High-T Black contains a particularly effective dose of Rhodiola Rosea, but we don’t see any red flags that would indicate a less-than effective dose.

TRIBULUS TERRESTRIS:

Tribulus has a well-documented history of use as an aphrodisiac and libido enhancer. Over the years, it has also gained a reputation as a Testosterone-booster, although recent research indicates otherwise.

A 2005 study, published in the “Journal of Ethnopharamcology” found that 200mg daily (60% saponin content) had no effect on Testosterone in healthy men.

These results were replicated in a 2007 study in which 450mg of Tribulus extract daily failed to influence Testosterone levels in male athletes.

Even a 2012 study, this time testing the effects of 6g of Tribulus extract on infertile men, found a less than significant trend towards increased Testosterone.

In the context of High T Black, Tribulus may function as a libido enhancer, but there is absolutely no evidence to suggest it will increase Testosterone. In fact, there is a large amount of evidence to the contrary.

L-CITRULLINE:

Citrulline is a precursor to the amino acid Arginine, which is a precursor to Nitric Oxide (NO).

However, Citrulline is actually significantly more effective at raising plasma Arginine than supplemental Arginine itself, and while results with Arginine are mixed, Citrulline has demonstrated clear efficacy as a performance enhancer.

A 2002 study, published in the “British Journal of Sports Medicine” found that Citrulline Malate supplementation (6g/day for 15 days) significantly increased ATP production during exercise in healthy adult males.

A 2009 study, published in the “Journal of Free Radical Research”, found that 6 grams of Citrulline Malate given to male cyclists before a race increased “plasma Arginine availability for NO synthesis and PMNs priming for oxidative burst without oxidative damage”.

Citrulline has been shown to increase the amount of reps performed at a given weight in a 2010 study from “The Journal of Strength & Conditioning” and a 2014 study from the “Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research”.

This is due to Citrulline increasing muscular contraction efficiency, effectively requiring less ATP for muscle contraction.

Unfortunately, judging by the weight of the proprietary blend as a whole, we can be certain that High T Black does not contain anywhere near a clinically effective dose of Citrulline.

ARGININE AKG:

A 2010 study from “The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research” found that post-exercise Arginine/Ornithine supplementation had no effect on Testosterone levels, but did increase GH and IGF-1 levels (with levels of these normalizing within one hour).

However, Arginine has also been shown to blunt the exercise-induced GH spike compared to exercise alone in a 2006 study and a 2008 study, both published in the “Journal of Applied Physiology”.

Currently the reason for the discrepancy is unknown, but given that any increase is likely to normalize quickly, Arginine isn’t an effective way maintaining consistently high GH levels.

We’re not really sure why KingFisher included Arginine AND Citrulline, since Citrulline is superior all around. Arginine does not improve the efficacy of the High T Black as a whole.

BETA-ALANINE:

Beta-Alanine is the rate limiting amino acid in the synthesis of the dipeptide, Carnosine, which acts as a lactic acid buffer in muscle tissue.  Reducing the build-up of lactic acid can directly enhance muscular endurance, and this has been demonstrated throughout multiple studies in both athletes and non-athletes alike.

A 2002 study from the “Japanese Journal of Physiology” which measured the Carnosine levels of sprinters found that individuals with higher muscular Carnosine levels exhibited higher power outputin the latter half of a 30m sprint (due to less lactic acid build-up). Multiple studies have confirmed that Beta Alanine supplementation increases muscular Carnosine in a dose dependent manner. In particular, a 2012 study published in “Amino Acids” found that subjects who consumed 1.6 or 3.2 grams of Beta Alanine daily experienced significant increases in muscle Carnosine in as little as two weeks, with the higher dose achieving a higher concentration of Carnosine.

When it comes to endurance enhancement, Beta-Alanine is quite effective, assuming the right dose. Unfortunately, High T Black contains nowhere near an effective dose of Beta-Alanine, even at multiple servings.

THE BOTTOM LINE:

Users of High T Black may experience noticeable libido enhancement but any significantly increase in Testosterone is unlikely. Furthermore, the ergogenic ingredients (Citrulline, Arginine, and Beta-Alanine) are pretty under-dosed and likely won’t provide much benefit in the context of High T Black. At around $1.25 per serving, High T Black is priced about average (for test-boosters) but there are definitely better formulas out there for that same price or less.

REFERENCES
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  5. Bushey, Brandon, et al. “Fenugreek Extract Supplementation Has No effect on the Hormonal Profile of Resitance-Trained Males.” International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Proceedings. Vol. 2. No. 1. 2009.
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  17. Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín, and Philip M. Jakeman. “Citrulline malate enhances athletic anaerobic performance and relieves muscle soreness.” The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 24.5 (2010): 1215-1222.
  18. Sureda, Antoni, et al. “Effects of L-citrulline oral supplementation on polymorphonuclear neutrophils oxidative burst and nitric oxide production after exercise.” Free radical research 43.9 (2009): 828-835.
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