Reviews

BSN Finish First Clean BCAA Review

BSN Clean BCAA

Finish First Clean BCAAs is one of BSN’s most recent Clean Series releases. It contains a simple blend of Leucine, Isoleucine, Valine, Glutamine, and Taurine, though the doses of some of these ingredients are pretty questionable…

 

Finish First Clean BCAAs is one of BSN’s most recent Clean Series releases. It contains a simple blend of Leucine, Isoleucine, Valine, Glutamine, and Taurine, though the doses of some of these ingredients are pretty questionable…

[SKIP TO THE BOTTOM LINE]

BCAAs

The term “Branched Chain Amino Acids” (BCAAs) refers to the amino acids Leucine, Isoleucine, and Valine which are commonly utilized together in a 2:1:1 ratio (Leucine, Isoleucine, Valine). While Leucine does appear to be the most critical in regards to muscle protein synthesis, a 2009 study published in the “Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition” concluded thatBCAAs (2:1:1) have a more pronounced effect on protein synthesis than the same amount of Leucine alone, indicating that all three is the best way to go.

Unfortunately, the 3g dose of Leucine, Isoleucine, and Valine (collectively) found in Finish First Clean BCAAs is not exactly what you could consider a clinically effective dose.

Glutamine

Glutamine has had some pretty mixed results when it comes to things like stimulating muscle protein synthesis or enhancing workout performance, but it does have one quality which makes it particularly useful for those who train often and rigorously.  Glutamine can help fight exercise-induced immune suppression.

For this reason, it is suggested that increased uptake of glutamine may help keep the immune system strong post-exercise. In addition, lower glutamine levels have been recorded in over-trained athletes, suggesting that higher levels of glutamine may help to prevent overtraining.

Unfortunately, the 500mg dose of Glutamine found in Finish First Clean BCAAs is pretty negligible.  Even at double the dose it would provide much benefit. Come on BSN, Glutamine is cheap!

Taurine

Taurine is an amino acid with antioxidant properties which give it a wide variety of implications pertaining to exercise.  It has been shown to reduce muscular oxidative stress resulting from exercise, making it an ideal recovery-aid.   Taurine has also been shown to improve performance in time-trial athletes which is thought to be related to a decrease in oxidative stress.

Unfortunately (again), BSN has under-dosed Taurine in Finish First Clean BCAAs on a per serving basis.  Users would need at least two servings to achieve a moderately effective dose.

The Bottom Line

Finish First Clean BCAAs contains effective ingredients, but is pretty under-dosed relative to what has proven beneficial in studies and what can be found in competing BCAA-based formulas.  With only 3g of BCAAs per serving and only 1g of Glutamine and Taurine combined, users would need to shoot for at least two servings at a time and, given the price, that’s just not reasonable.

Still don’t know which BCAA/Amino Supplement is right for you? Check out our Best Amino Acid Supplements List!

REFERENCES
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  16. Shimomura, Yoshiharu, et al. “Nutraceutical effects of branched-chain amino acids on skeletal muscle.” The Journal of nutrition 136.2 (2006): 529S-532S.
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  18. Gomez-Merino, D., et al. Evidence that the branched-chain amino acid L-valine prevents exercise-induced release of 5-HT in rat hippocampus. Int J Sports Med. 2001 Jul;22(5):317-22
  19. Casperson, Shanon L., et al. “Leucine supplementation chronically improves muscle protein synthesis in older adults consuming the RDA for protein.”Clinical Nutrition 31.4 (2012): 512-519.

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