Reviews

ANS Performance Amino HP Review

Amino HP is the most recent addition to the ANS Performance line which features a variety of performance and recovery ingredients, some well-known and some quite new to the category…

ANS Amino HP

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BCAAs

The term “Branched Chain Amino Acids” (BCAAs) refers to the amino acids Leucine, Isoleucine, and Valine which are commonly utilized together in a 2:1:1 ratio (Leucine, Isoleucine, Valine). While Leucine does appear to be the most critical in regards to muscle protein synthesis, a 2009 study published in the “Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition” concluded thatBCAAs (2:1:1) have a more pronounced effect on protein synthesis than the same amount of Leucine alone, indicating that all three is the best way to go.

Amino HP contains 5g of BCAAs in the classic 2:1:1 ratio, a solid dose which may certainly encourage and enhance muscle protein synthesis.

Taurine

Taurine has been shown to reduce exercise-induced oxidative muscle damage in multiple studies.  While these findings certainly implicate Taurine as a recovery aid, it may also enhance exercise performance.

A recent 2013 study, also from “Amino Acids” noted a 1.7% improvement in 3k-time trial of runnersafter supplementing with Taurine, and these findings were further corroborated in a later 2013 study from “Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism”  in which Taurine supplementation was able to increase strength as well as decrease oxidative muscle damage in human subjects.

Amino HP contains 2g of Taurine per serving, an effective dose on par with what has been used in a clinical setting.

Betaine Anhydrous

Betaine (also known as Trimethylglycine) is the amino acid Glycine with the addition of three methyl groups attached. Betaine is alleged to increase power output and strength by increasing cellular swelling, a phenomenon well established with Creatine supplementation, which can drastically reduce the damaging effect of outside stimuli (such as exercise) on the working muscle. So far, Betaine has been investigated in several human studies, and has had some pretty encouraging results in most.

We discuss the strength/performance implications of Betaine in-depth in this article.  Amino HP contains the industry standard dose of 1250mg per serving.

Choline

Choline is required for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter Acetylcholine, so it is commonly included in products aimed at boosting cognitive function.  However, as ANS points out, it has performance implications as well.  Choline can become depleted by rigorous exercise, so Choline Bitartrate serves as a way of maintaining optimal circulating Choline levels.

It has also been shown to reduce bodyweight while preserving strength in female martial arts athletes, but results like this need some replication before we can really draw conclusions there.

Amino HP contains 500mg of Choline Bitartrate.

Amentoflavone

Amentoflavone, also found in ANS’s pump pre-workout Dilate, is a relatively new entrant in the supplement industry which is alleged to a have a variety of performance implications.

Indeed, Amentoflavone has been shown, in vitro, to be a relatively potent vasodilator, with one study demonstrating that it can reduce noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction by 35%.

Beyond that, Amentaflavone may also be able to enhance muscular contractions, as discussed in depth in this article.  Ultimately, while Amentoflavone should still be considered a speculative ingredient, it helps to add a dimension of uniqueness to Amino HP.

L-Citrulline

Citrulline is an amino acid which serves as a precursor to Arginine, and therefore is directly involved in the production of Nitric Oxide.  Unlike supplemental Arginine, however, Citrulline is quite reliable at increasing plasma Arginine and ultimately enhancing performance.

Citrulline has been shown to increase muscular contraction efficiency, meaning less ATP is required for a given workload.  This mechanism explains why subjects who consumed Citrulline were able to perform more reps later on in the workout compared to subjects who consumed a placebo.

Additionally, Citrulline has been shown to reduce muscle soreness effectively making it both a performance enhancing ingredient as well a recovery agent.

There is also preliminary evidence to suggest Citrulline may act in a synergistic manner with Leucine by positively affecting Leucine’s stimulation of mTOR, which is why we like seeing it in BCAA-based supplements such as Amino HP.

Rosa Roxburghii

Rosa roxburghii has an extensive and relatively well-documented use in traditional medicine as an overall vitality/longevity agent, mostly tied to its antioxidant properties.

ANS specifically mentions that Rosa roxburghii does have implications for athletes as it has been shown, in mice, to enhance glycogen recovery post-exercise.  While these findings should be viewed as strictly preliminary, they do certainly warrant further (human) research and lend credibility to the notion that Rosa roxburghii can favorably impact exercise performance and/or recovery.

The Bottom Line

Amino HP is no doubt one of the more comprehensive and unique BCAA formulas out there right now.  ANS has taken the performance and recovery aspect of the formula way beyond that of other “just BCAA” formulas.  Amino HP is a breath of fresh air in a category (aminos) that hasn’t seen much innovation, despite being one the most saturated.

Still not sure which amino acid supplement is right for you?  Check out our Best Amino Acid Supplements List!

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