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Nutrex Adipodex Review

Adipodex

 

Adipodex is the most recent stimulant-based fat-burner to be released by Nutrex, the makers of the Lipo 6 line. The formula is relatively straightforward and does contain some effective ingredients…

[SKIP TO THE BOTTOM LINE]

CAFFEINE:

Caffeine generally serves a key ingredient in stimulant-based fat-burners because of it’s ability to release Catecholamines (Noradrenaline, Dopamine, etc.), which induce lipolysis (fat-breakdown). Although this mechanism can certainly burn fat in the short-term, prolonged Caffeine consumption (by itself) generally results in tolerance build-up so the effects become less potent over time. This was demonstrated in a 1992 study in which 24 weeks of Caffeine intake (200mg/day) failed to induce weight-loss in humans. For this reason, for Caffeine to be an effective fat-loss agent, it must be combined with other stimulants such as Synephrine.

Nutrex does not actually disclose the exact amount of Caffeine present in the Adipodex formula, but based on its position (first) in the proprietary blend, we’d estimate anywhere between 200 and 300mg.

AMP CITRATE:

4-amino-2-methylpentane citrate, also known as 1,3 dimethylbutylamine, bares striking chemical similarities to 1,3 dimethylamylamine (DMAA), the compound that became wildly popular among pre-workouts and fat-burners before being banned by the FDA. Like DMAA, very little is known about 1,3 dimethylbutylamine, other than that it has a very similar chemical structure so it should have similar effects. Anecdotal reports of 1,3 dimethylbutylamine indicate the effects are similar, though perhaps not as overwhelmingly potent, and many are calling it “the next DMAA”. Unfortunately, until more studies are published, we really won’t know too much about this compound, the benefits or the pitfalls.

Though Nutrex isn’t the first to use AMP Citrate, the ingredient is still a relatively new entrant in the supplement industry, so even anecdotal evidence is hard to come by. Because AMP Citrate is chemically similar to DMAA, it is possible that it may have similar potential for weight-loss (albeit less potent), making it a potentially effective, but still highly speculative, addition to the Adipodex formula.

N-ACETYL L-TYROSINE:

Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid (the body can produce it from Phenylalanine) which serves a precursor to Dopamine (by first being converted into L-Dopa) and Noradrenaline. Because of this relationship, Tyrosine is alleged to increase levels of these neurotransmitters, which would theoretically lead to performance enhancement. However, research has demonstrated that Tyrosine cannot outright raise Dopamine or Noradrenaline levels upon ingestion, though it can help maintain optimal levels when depletion might otherwise occur.

Upon ingestion, Tyrosine forms substrate pool, which can then be drawn from when an acute stressor (exercise, cold exposure, etc.) causes a temporary depletion of Dopamine/Noradrenaline. For this reason, Tyrosine can be useful for maintaining cognitive function during long-term, mentally strenuous exercise.

Although Tyrosine doesn’t have any direct implications for weight-loss, it may simply support Catecholamine levels which ultimately can “optimize”, but not outright increase, lipolysis. Adipodex contains an undisclosed dose of N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine, but based on its position in the proprietary blend, we estimate anywhere from 100-200mg.

THEOBROMINE:

Theobromine belongs to the same class of chemical compounds as caffeine, known as methylxanthines. While its stimulant properties are less potent than caffeine, it is alleged to increase heart rate to a greater degree. In theory, increasing heart rate could provide more oxygen for fat oxidation (burning fat), but this is truly just a theory. Very few studies have examined the effects of Theobromine on weight loss, and those that have, have studied the effects in conjunction with other stimulants such as Caffeine and Synephrine. While it is doubtful that Theobromine by itself has much potential for weight-loss, it may contribute some when combined with the other stimulants present in the Adipodex formula.

YOHIMBINE:

As mentioned above, Yohimbine acts as an alpha-2 receptor antagonist, meaning it inhibits the receptor responsible for blocking lipolysis. By blocking the action of this receptor Yohimbine allows for more lipolysis to occur than would normally be permitted by the alpha-adrenergic receptors.

A 2006 study, published in “Research in Sports Medicine”, found that supplementation with 20mg daily (2 10mg doses) induced significant fat-loss in athletes (Soccer players) over a two week period.

Given its role as an alpha-receptor antagonist, Yohimbine may be synergistic with other stimulants such as Synephrine and Caffeine which tend to induce lipolysis via beta-receptor agonism. Nutrex doesn’t tell us the exact dose of Yohimbine present in the Adipodex formula but, generally speaking, it doesn’t take much to meaningfully impact lipolysis, so even 2-5mg would be a potentially effective dose. Yohimbine:

PIPER NIGRUM FRUIT EXTRACT (BIOPERINE):

Piper nigrum, also known as Black Pepper, contains Piperine. Several studies have found that black pepper extract, when combined with other supplements, has increased the absorption of those supplements (as measured by plasma levels). Piperine’s ability to increase absorption of other compounds is due to the inhibition of certain enzymes which breakdown most compounds, as well as the slowing of intestinal transit (increasing the amount of time these compounds are exposed to the possibility of uptake).

THE BOTTOM LINE:

Adipodex contains a concise blend of some effective fat-burning ingredients, and can certainly be classified a stimulant-based fat-burner. The addition of AMP Citrate helps to differentiate the formula from other fat-burners currently available, even though Nutrex is not the true “first mover” with regards to its use. Although Nutrex does not disclose the individual ingredient levels present in the Adipodex formula, based on a 720mg proprietary blend, there are no obvious red flags when it comes to dosing. If consumed on a regular basis (preferably in the morning and before workouts), certainly has the potential to effective burn excess fat.

REFERENCES
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