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Shred JYM Review

Shred JYM is JYM Supplement Science’s fat-burner which contains several established fat-burning ingredients which are all, for the most part, effectively dosed…

Shred JYM

ACETYL-L-CARNITINE

Carnitine is an amino acid that is heavily involved with the metabolism of fat for energy. It is required for the proper transport of fatty acids in the mitochondria, where they are oxidized through the process known as “beta-oxidation” for energy. Carnitine deficiency has been shown to result in hindered fat-burning capacity. Because of this integral role in the fat-burning process, Carnitine supplementation is alleged to burn-fat. However, while it has certainly been shown to normalize the fat-burning process in those who are deficient, the implications for healthy individuals are less clear.

A 2002 study, published in “Metabolism”, found that Carnitine supplementation (1g/day) increase fatty acid oxidation rates in humans without Carnitine deficiency.

A 2004 study from the same journal found that L-Carnitine supplementation (3g/day) increased fatty acid oxidation in overweight subjects while having no effect on protein synthesis or breakdown. However, a 2005 study, published in the “International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research”, found that Carnitine supplementation failed to influence weight-loss in rats. The results of this study were in-line with an earlier (2000) study in which L-Carnitine supplementation (4g/day) failed to influence fat mass, body mass, or resting lipid utilization in moderately obese women in combination with aerobic training.

A more recent (2010) study found that Carnitine supplementation did favorably influence fatty acid utilization in rats, though this study did not measure fat mass post-supplementation.

Ultimately, Carnitine does possess the mechanisms by which it should burn fat (via increased utilization of fatty acids), though supplementation has failed to result in weight-loss in animals and humans. For now, we prefer to think of Carnitine as a means of “optimizing” the fat-burning process, though it may not outright increase it.

Shred JYM contains 1500mg of Acetyl-L-Carnitine per serving, about 3 times what we generally see in Carnitine-containing fat-burners.

L-TYROSINE

Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid which serves as a precursor to the neurotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, the three of which are collectively referred to as ‘catecholamines’. A 1981 study found that subjects who consumed 100mg/kg of Tyrosine experienced a significant increase in urinary catecholamine levels, but supplemental Tyrosine has failed to produce the performance enhancing effects commonly associated with increased release of catecholamine. This is because Tyrosine does not instantly get converted into noradrenaline, dopamine, or adrenaline. It forms a pool, and when there is a deficit of these neurotransmitters, the pool is drawn from to create more. So, rather than directly increase levels of these neurotransmitters, Tyrosine effectively restores them when deficiency occurs. This deficiency occurs in times of stress, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to cold, and exercise. As JYM points out, Tyrosine can help counter the cognitive decline generally associated with dieting and exercising at the same time. So, while Tyrosine will not directly influence fat-loss, it certainly has a place in a weight-loss formula for maintaining optimal cognitive function.

GREEN TEA EXTRACT (EGCG)

Like Green Coffee, Green Tea Extract has demonstrated the capacity for weight-loss in multiple studies, although through a very different mechanism of action. The primary compound present in Green Tea Extract, responsible for the weight-loss benefits, is Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG).

A 2009 study, published in “The Journal of Nutrition”, found that subjects consuming 625mg Green Tea Catechins (EGCG) alongside 40mg Caffeine paired with exercise lost an average of 2.2kg (4.8lbs) compared to the subjects in the control group (consuming just Caffeine), who lost an average of 1kg (2.2lbs). These findings were corroborated by a 2009 meta-analysis, published in the “International Journal of Obesity”, which concluded that Green Tea extract tended to cause about 1.2kg (2.6lbs) reduction in bodyweight, and that effects could be amplified with Caffeine in non-caffeine tolerant individuals.

Further research has revealed that EGCG can effectively block Catechol-o-Methyl Transferase (COMT), the enzyme responsible for the degradation of Catcholamines such as Noradrenaline. The result is an indirect increase in Noradrenaline which induces lipolysis. So, while EGCG is not likely to induce noticeable weight-loss alone, when combined with Caffeine or other Noradrenaline-releasing stimulants, it can be quite synergistic. Most of the efficacy has been demonstrated using doses of 400-500mg EGCG daily, and the less caffeine-tolerant the individual, the better.

On Point contains 250mg of Green Tea Extract, containing 150mg of EGCG, per serving. So, the recommended protocol (two servings daily) would yield 300mg EGCG, slightly less than the recommended 400-500mg range, but still potentially somewhat effective.

CAYENNE PEPPER (CAPSIMAX)

Capsimax is a brand name for capsicum extract, a group of plants that include the pepper family. Capsaicin, the active ingredient in Capsimax, has been shown to increase lipolysis (fat burning) in rats as well as humans. A 2007 study noted an increase in fat oxidation (relative to placebo) during low intensity exercise in healthy adult males who consumed 150mg of capsaicin one hour before exercise. These findings make capsaicin of interest to those looking to decrease fat without the use of stimulants and, while some supplement companies certainly overstate the efficacy of Capsaicin as it pertains to weight loss, all studies certainly indicate fat burning potential. Whether Capsaicin can work synergistically with stimulants such as caffeine and syneprhine to further increase fat oxidation remains to be tested.

SYNEPHRINE

AdvantraZ is a patented form of Bitter Orange Extract which is standardized for Synephrine. Syneprhine became popular after the FDA banned Ephedra as a dietary supplement for weight loss, because they share a similar mechanism of action. While Synephrine has been touted as a replacement for Ephedra, it is important to understand that it is significantly less potent (which is why it is not banned). However, that’s not to say it is completely useless. A 2011 study, published in the “International Journal of Medicinal Sciences”, found that supplementation of 50mg Syneprhine increased the metabolic rate in human subjects without affecting blood pressure or heart rate. Similarly to Ephedrine, Synephrine is a beta-receptor agonist and an alpha-receptor antagonist, the net effect of which is an increase in lipolysis.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Although not containing any “break-through” fat-burning ingredients, Shred JYM has a pretty strong ingredient profile and one of the strongest safety profiles we’ve seen in any fat-burner. Generally, fat-burners contain several stimulants, most of which have never been studied in depth with regards to safety. Shred JYM contains two stimulants, Caffeine and Synephrine, both with well-established safety profiles at the given doses. At just over 50 cents per serving, Shred JYM is pretty comepetitively priced, making two servings daily a viable option.

Still not sure which fat-burner is right for you?  Check out our Top 10 Fat-Burners List!

References

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