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Nite Burn Review

Nite Burn

Nite Burn is BPI’s attempt at a night-time fat-burner. While it may be effective as a sleep-aid, the weight-loss ingredients present in the blend are either ineffective or under-dosed…

 

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Nite Burn is BPI’s attempt at a night-time fat-burner. While it may be effective as a sleep-aid, the weight-loss ingredients present in the blend are either ineffective or under-dosed…[Skip to the Bottom Line]

VITAMIN D:

Vitamin D is required for a wide variety of processes within the body including (but not limited to) proper bone structure, and mood support. Unlike other vitamins, Vitamin D is manufactured when skin is exposed to sunlight. However, those who don’t get out much or wear heavy-duty sunscreen all the time may experience less than optimal vitamin D levels, and thus may benefit from supplementation.

With regards to vitamin D’s inclusion in Nite Burn: It is hypothesized (not proven) that vitamin D deficiency may lead to obesity. This theory is based on the evolutionary notion that lower vitamin D levels are indicative of the seasonal transition from summer to winter, and this encourages increased calorie consumption. Evolutionarily, we have no objection and in animals, this may even hold true.

However, because humans are free thinking and capable of using logic, the hypothesis falls apart when an individual simply maintains the same caloric intake regardless of the season. Lower vitamin D levels have been noted in obese individual when compared to other non-obese individuals, but its big leap from correlation to causation. Currently, there is just not enough evidence to conclude that Vitamin D supplementation may result in weight loss.

RASPBERRY KETONE:

Raspberry Ketones, a molecular constituent of Raspberries, have become a popular weight-loss additive in dietary supplements. However, the evidence for raspberry ketones as a fat-burning ingredient is extremely limited and there is actually no direct evidence the ingredient is effective in oral, supplemental doses. In vitro studies using very high concentrations have shown positive results, but human studies are non-existent. The only human study that exists grouped RK in with several other popular weight loss ingredients so the effects cannot be attributed to raspberry ketones. Even in rat studies, RK fail to show any significant fat-burning effects. The overall consensus of the scientific community is that raspberry ketones are nothing more than industry hype.

WHITE KIDNEY BEAN:

White Kidney Bean is actually not a “fat burner” at all, but more of a calorie blocker. Both in vitro, and in vivo studies have demonstrated the ability of White Kidney Bean to block the absorption of carbohydrates, when consumed simultaneously, via inhibition of amylase (a digestive enzyme responsible for breaking down starches). By reducing carbohydrate absorption, WKB may mimic the effects of a calorie restricted diet to some degree. While all studies have confirmed that there is some carb-blocking effect, the degree tends to vary and the total weight loss effect is likely influenced by many individual factors.

GREEN COFFEE EXTRACT:

Green Coffee Extract contains a compound known as Chlorogenic Acid, which is believed to be responsible for the weight loss benefits GCE has become so well known for in the supplement industry. While GCE has shown promise in multiple studies regarding its ability to promote weight loss via blocking the absorption of carbohydrates, there are certain conflicts of interest present that lead us to believe the results of these studies have been overstated by supplement companies who simply want to promote their product. The potential weight loss effects of GCE cannot be completely ruled out, as it would be difficult to completely fabricate positive study results. However, GCE has built a reputation as a “miracle” weight loss supplement, and based on the evidence, this is certainly an exaggeration.

DANDELION EXTRACT:

Dandelion contains a wide variety of vitamins and minerals including high levels of potassium. Extracts from the plant have been use in folk medicine specifically as a diuretic. A 1993 study published in Pharmaceutical Biology pointed to the high potassium content as a possible reason for the diuretic effect. A 2009 study published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine confirmed that supplementation with Dandelion Extract appeared to cause more frequent urination in subjects. Ultimately, while water certainly contributes to bodyweight, we do not view long term dehydration as a viable way to lose weight. Fat is what you should focus on limiting if you want to lose weight, not water.

L-TRYPTOPHAN:

The amino acid Tryptophan is a pre-precursor to the neurotransmitter serotonin, which is the neurotransmitter most associated with sleep (among other things). Tryptophan is first converted into 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), which is then converted into serotonin. However, several studies have shown that supplemental tryptophan is actually less effective at increasing serotonin levels in the brain than 5-HTP because it bypasses the tryptophan hydroxylase enzyme, which is the rate limiting step in serotonin synthesis from tryptophan. Given that 5-HTP is widely available in supplement form, and is in fact used in several competing sleep supplements, we question the use of tryptophan in the Nite Burn formula.

SAFFRON:

A 2012 study, published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, found that mice who were given crocin and crocetin (the primary active agents found in Saffron) experienced a significant increase in non-REM sleep, with no noted changes in total REM sleep. While these results are preliminary at best, they do warrant further research into the sleep-related effects of Crocus Sativus.

MELATONIN:

Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, found in the brain. It is heavily involved in the sleep-wake cycle (by causing drowsiness when secreted). Due to its role in promoting sleep, supplemental melatonin has been used to correct and treat mild sleep disorders, as well as by people who experience mild sleeplessness. All evidence suggests that melatonin works very well when it comes to promoting sleep, but the quality of sleep is more difficult to record. A 2004 study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, found that melatonin significantly increased REM sleep in subjects who suffer from lower than normal REM sleep durations. Several other studies have demonstrated the ability of melatonin to increase REM sleep duration, as well as decrease sleep latency (time to fall asleep). Overall, melatonin may be very useful as a sleep aid, and may increase REM sleep especially in those experiencing REM deprivation to some.

LEMON BALM:

Lemon Balm: Lemon Balm has long been used in traditional medicine as a relaxtion/sleep aid and is alleged to improve quality of sleep. There is also preliminary evidence to suggest Lemon Balm may attenuate certain stressors, but further research is needed before conclusions can be drawn. Furthermore, studies regarding the potential sleep enhancing effects of Lemon Balm tend to include Valerian as well, making it difficult to determine the efficacy of just Lemon Balm alone.

THE BOTTOM LINE:

Unfortunately, individuals pursuing significant weight loss may be disappointed with the final results (or lack thereof) after using Nite Burn. While we understand the need for non-stimulant based weight loss supplements, the truth is that the weight loss products that work tend to contain stimulants. There are very few substances proven to burn fat or result in weight loss that do not have stimulant characteristics. Raspberry Ketones are simply ineffective in a practical sense, and Green Coffee Extract has been extremely over-hyped by supplement companies who are desperately searching for a magic weight loss pill to satisfy consumers. On the sleep end of things, Nite Burn may be quite effective (mostly due to melatonin). However, the same effects could be accomplished with a much less expensive product, solely aimed at improving sleep. In the end, we would be lying if we said users of Nite Burn were likely to experience weight loss. While we applaud the efforts of BPI in trying to create a magic pill that melts away fat while you sleep, Nite Burn just falls short with regards to the weight loss claims.

REFERENCES
  1. Patel, Sanjay R., et al. “Association between reduced sleep and weight gain in women.” American Journal of Epidemiology 164.10 (2006): 947-954.
  2. Udani, Jay, Mary Hardy, and Damian C. Madsen. “Blocking carbohydrate absorption and weight loss: a clinical trial using Phase 2™ brand proprietary fractionated white bean extract.” Alternative medicine review 9.1 (2004): 63-69.
  3. Pusztai, A., et al. “Lipid accumulation in obese Zucker rats is reduced by inclusion of raw kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the diet.” British Journal of Nutrition 79.2 (1998): 213-222.
  4. Hartmann, Ernest. “Effects of L-tryptophan on sleepiness and on sleep.”Journal of psychiatric research 17.2 (1983): 107-113.
  5. Masaki, Mika, et al. “Crocin promotes non‐rapid eye movement sleep in mice.”Molecular nutrition & food research 56.2 (2012): 304-308.
  6. Dellalibera, S. S. Ą., B. Lemaire, and S. Lafay. “„Svetol*, green coffee extract, induces weight loss and increases the lean to fat mass ratio in volunteers with overweight problem.”.” Phytotherapie 4.4 (2006): 194-197.
  7. Ho, Lap, et al. “Dietary supplementation with decaffeinated green coffee improves diet-induced insulin resistance and brain energy metabolism in mice.”Nutritional neuroscience 15.1 (2012): 37-45.
  8. Cerny, A., and K. Schmid. “Tolerability and efficacy of valerian/lemon balm in healthy volunteers (a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre study).”Fitoterapia 70.3 (1999): 221-228.
  9. Müller, S. F., and S. Klement. “A combination of valerian and lemon balm is effective in the treatment of restlessness and dyssomnia in children.”Phytomedicine 13.6 (2006): 383-387.
  10. Kennedy, David O., Wendy Little, and Andrew B. Scholey. “Attenuation of laboratory-induced stress in humans after acute administration of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm).” Psychosomatic medicine 66.4 (2004): 607-613.

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