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Neon Sport Intercept Review

Neon Sport Intercept

 

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Intercept is Neon Sport’s multi-mechanism hardening agent which aims to reduce Cortisol, Estrogen, and water weight…[Skip to the Bottom Line]

AGARICUS BISPORUS:

Agaricus bisporus (A.K.A. White Button Mushroom) has been shown to act as a potent aromatase inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Aromatase, for those unfamiliar with the subject, is the enzyme responsible for converting excess testosterone into estrogen. By inhibiting (blocking) the enzyme, free testoosterone levels may increase. A 2006 study, published in “Cancer Research” fond that extracts from Agaricus bisporus were effective aromatase inhibitors in both cells and living mice. Although the subjects of this study were not human, the results fell in-line with those of an earlier (2001) study in which White Buttom Mushroom extract inhibited aromatase activity and cancer cell proliferation in women with breast cancer. So, it appears White Button Mushroom does contain certain compounds which may effectively inhibit aromatase in humans. Ideally, we need a study in which healthy men are the subjects to be completely sure, but so far White Button Mushroom has shown nothing but promise.

INDOLE-3-CARBINOL:

Indole-3-Carbinol (I3C) is found mostly in cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, brussel sprouts, kale, etc), but has become relatively popular as a dietary supplement for its potential to alter estrogen metabolism, as evidenced in a 1990 study published in the “Journal of the National Cancer Institute” in which 500mg Indole-3-Carbinol administered to humans significantly upregulated the conversion of estradiol (major estrogen) into its less active counterparts, estrone and estriol. It’s important to understand that the term “Estrogen” is really an umbrella term that refers to a group. Within that group are Estradiol, Estrone, and Estriol. The type of “bad estrogen” hated by bodybuilders and cancer patients alike is Estradiol. However, Estradiol can be converted into Estrone and Estriol which don’t cause the negative effects “estrogen” has become known for. Indole-3-Carbinol may in fact help this conversion take place, leaving less “bad estrogen”.

HOLY BASIL LEAF EXTRACT:

Holy Basil Leaf is considered, by practitioners of herbal medicine, to be an adaptogen. An adaptogen is anything that has the capacity to help the body adapt to stress on a cellular level. There are hunderds (perhaps even thousands) of herbs in use all around the world, most with very little scientific evidence to support the types of claims that are made about them. A 2005 study, published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, found that animals that were given a Holy Basil Leaf extract were less susceptible to noise induced stress. These findings fell in line with an earlier 1997 study which found that mice who were given a Holy Basil Leaf extract had lower corticosterone levels following an acute stressor (noise), than the mice who did not receive the extract. Corticosterone is the main glucocorticoid in rodents, while cortisol is the main glucocorticoid found in humans. Glucocorticoid are primarily involved with glucose metabolism and regulation. During times of stress, these compounds supply the body with glucose which is harvested from amino acids (which come from muscle protein). The primary active component in Holy Basil is Ursolic Acid, which is thought to inhibit the conversion of cortisone to cortisol. However, there are no studies testing this so currently it remains only a theory. Furthermore, Ursolic Acid has demonstrated potentially minor anti-aromatase activity in vitro.

PASSION FLOWER EXTRACT:

Passion Flower is an herb with a long history of use, mostly pertaining to anti-anxiety properties. You may see passion flower supplements aimed at enhancing the quality of sleep, but it is generally accepted that passion flower does not cause drowsiness. While the exact mechanism of action is not known at this point in time, a few competing theories are that passion flower increases the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and that it may have a cortisol lowering effect, The main function of GABA is to reduce brain cell activity, resulting in relaxation (as opposed to anxiety which is the result of increased brain cell activity). Cortisol, the stress hormone is secreted during (you guessed it) times of stress, whether it be physical or psychological. Working out increases cortisol concentration, and too much cortisol results in the breakdown of muscle amino acid stores, and increased fat storage (particularly around the abdomen). Unfortuantely, there are no studies directly testing the effects of Passionflower on cortisol.

BANABA LEAF EXTRACT:

The active compound in Banaba is Corosolic Acid which has been demonstrated to act as a less potent substitute to insulin with regards to blood-glucose. While no direct effect on cortisol has been obvserved as a result of corosolic acid supplementation, high Cortisol often leads to increased blood glucose, so Corosolic acid may serve as a way of countering the negative effects of Cortisol, rather than countering Cortisol itself. We’re assuming Neon added Corosolic Acid to the blend to prevent that post-workout glucose spike.

CHROMIUM PICOLONATE:

Chromium is primarily involved in the regulation of blood glucose. One 2010 study showed that supplementation with chromium significantly reduced cortisol in vitro, though these effects have not been repliacted in humans. Ultimately, the benefit of chromium is (as mentioned above) in regards to glucose regulation. Deficiencies can lead to increased insulin resistance in humans. However, Chromium is found in sufficient doses in meat, dairy products, whole grains, as well as various vegetables, so individuals who consume a relatively balanced diet are not likely to be chromium-deficient. That being said, a little extra Chromium likely won’t hurt, and those who are insulin-resistant may benefit.

UVA URSI LEAF EXTRACT:

Uva Ursi Leaf is used in folk medicine for the treatment of urinary tract infections. The active chemical compound in the plant is a glycoside known as Arbutin, which has diuretic as well as astringent properties. While the diuretic effect of Arbutin may interest those looking to lose water weight, it is worth mentioning that Arbutin converts to Hydroquinone, a potentially toxic compound. While there is some evidence to suggest Hydroquinone may be carcinogenic, the evidence is not overwhelming enough for the FDA to ban products that contain Arbutin. The amount of Arbutin present in the Intercept formula is likely insignificant compared to what has demonstrated these potentially harmful effects in animal studies, but individuals consuming other Uva Ursi/Arbutin containing products should be aware of the potential hazards if too much is consumed. Needless to say, Neon is concerned with the diuretic effect of the extract, which is why they included in the “Water Intercept Matrix”.

DANDELION ROOT EXTRACT:

Taraxacum Officinale, also known as Dandelion, has a long history of use in alternative medicine as a diuretic. A 1993 study published in “Pharmaceutical Biology” pointed to the high potassium content as a possible reason for the diuretic of effect, though various compounds have been isolated and alleged to contribute to this effect. A 2009 study published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that supplementation with Dandelion Extract caused more frequent urination in subjects, but a specific mechanism of action was not identified. Ultimately, while water certainly contributes to bodyweight, we do not view long term dehydration as a viable way to lose weight, and would caution users of diuretics against thinking of water as an enemy, as they might think of fat.

THE BOTTOM LINE:

Intercept is unique in that it targets estrogen, cortisol/blood glucose, and water rentention. The formula contains several ingredients with varying degrees of efficacy, some of which are supported by human trials, and some of which may require further research before drawing definite conclusions. Ultimately, Intercept is one of the more effective anti-estrogen products we’ve come across, and users of this product may very well benefit to some degree. At a price of around $1 per serving, Intercept is fairly priced relative to competing products, though there aren’t many with a similar ingredient profile.

REFERENCES
  1. Chen, Shiuan, et al. “Anti-aromatase activity of phytochemicals in white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).” Cancer research 66.24 (2006): 12026-12034.
  2. Grube, Baiba J., et al. “White button mushroom phytochemicals inhibit aromatase activity and breast cancer cell proliferation.” The Journal of nutrition131.12 (2001): 3288-3293.
  3. Broadbent, Thomas A., and H. Smith Broadbent. “1-1. The chemistry and pharmacology of indole-3-carbinol (indole-3-methanol) and 3-(methoxymethyl) indole.[Part I].” Curr Med Chem 5.5 (1998): 337-52.
  4. Marconett, Crystal N., et al. “Indole-3-carbinol triggers aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent estrogen receptor (ER) α protein degradation in breast cancer cells disrupting an ERα-GATA3 transcriptional cross-regulatory loop.”Molecular biology of the cell 21.7 (2010): 1166-1177.
  5. Shilling, Adam D., et al. “3, 3′-Diindolylmethane, a major condensation product of indole-3-carbinol, is a potent estrogen in the rainbow trout.” Toxicology and applied pharmacology 170.3 (2001): 191-200.
  6. Kim, Beob G., et al. “Effects of Chromium (III) Picolinate on Cortisol and DHEAs Secretion in H295R Human Adrenocortical Cells.” Biological trace element research 133.2 (2010): 171-180.
  7. Hook, I., A. McGee, and M. Henman. “Evaluation of dandelion for diuretic activity and variation in potassium content.” Pharmaceutical biology 31.1 (1993): 29-34.
  8. Michnovicz, Jon J., Herman Adlercreutz, and H. Leon Bradlow. “Changes in levels of urinary estrogen metabolites after oral indole-3-carbinol treatment in humans.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute 89.10 (1997): 718-723.
  9. Sanderson, J. Thomas, et al. “2, 3, 7, 8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and diindolylmethanes differentially induce cytochrome P450 1A1, 1B1, and 19 in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells.” Toxicological sciences 61.1 (2001): 40-48.
  10. Sembulingam, K., Prema Sembulingam, and A. Namasivayam. “Effect of< i> Ocimum sanctum Linn on the changes in central cholinergic system induced by acute noise stress.” Journal of ethnopharmacology 96.3 (2005): 477-482.
  11. Arunabh Bhattacharya, Abhijit Chatterjeeb, Shibnath Ghosalc, and Salil K. Bhattacharyac. “Antioxidant activity of active tannoid principles of Emblica officinalis (amla).” Indian journal of experimental biology 37 (1999): 676-680.
  12. Hook, I., A. McGee, and M. Henman. “Evaluation of dandelion for diuretic activity and variation in potassium content.” Pharmaceutical biology 31.1 (1993): 29-34.
  13. Michnovicz, Jon J., Herman Adlercreutz, and H. Leon Bradlow. “Changes in levels of urinary estrogen metabolites after oral indole-3-carbinol treatment in humans.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute 89.10 (1997): 718-723.
  14. Sanderson, J. Thomas, et al. “2, 3, 7, 8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and diindolylmethanes differentially induce cytochrome P450 1A1, 1B1, and 19 in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells.” Toxicological sciences 61.1 (2001): 40-48.
  15. Sembulingam, K., Prema Sembulingam, and A. Namasivayam. “Effect of< i> Ocimum sanctum Linn on the changes in central cholinergic system induced by acute noise stress.” Journal of ethnopharmacology 96.3 (2005): 477-482.
  16. Sembulingam, K., Prema Sembulingam, and A. Namasivayam. “Effect of Ocimum sanctum Linn on noise induced changes in plasma corticosterone level.” Indian journal of physiology and pharmacology 41 (1997): 139-143.
  17. Rollinger JM, et al. 11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 inhibiting constituents from Eriobotrya japonica revealed by bioactivity-guided isolation and computational approaches. Bioorg Med Chem. (2010)
  18. Ganßer, Dietmar, and Gerhard Spiteller. “Aromatase inhibitors from Urtica dioica roots.” Planta medica 61.02 (1995): 138-140.

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