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NDS Nutrition Evolean Review

EvoLean

 

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EvoLean is a non-stimulant fat-burner which, unlike other NDS Nutrition supplements we’ve reviewed, actually contains effective doses of key ingredients.

GREEN COFFEE EXTRACT:

A 2010 study from “Food and Chemical Toxicology” found multiple anti-obesity effects of Chlorogenic Acid administered to mice including increase beta-oxidations. However, Chlorogenic Acid may also have an alternative mechanism of action via inhibition of carbohydrate absorption.

A 2007 study, published in the “Journal of International Medical Research”, found that 12 weeks of Green Coffee (yielding 450-500mg Clorogenic Acid) supplementation resulted in a reduction (6.9%) in glucose absorption in healthy volunteers. Researchers also noted average weight loss of 5.4 kg (almost 12 lbs) over the duration of the study in the group receiving the Green Coffee Extract.

These findings conflict with an earlier 2006 study in which Green Coffee Extract (yielding 140mg Chlorogenic Acid) supplementation did not result in weight loss over the same 12 week period. The obvious difference between these two studies is that the dose of the first (positive) study was about 3 times the dose used in the second (negative) study.

A 2012 study found that adults who consumed GCE (containing about 315mg Chlorogenic Acid) daily lost an average of 8kg with the average reduction in body fat being about 4%. Though GCE has shown mixed results in various studies, efficacy has been demonstrated using higher doses.

EvoLean contains 1200mg GCE standardized to about 600mg Chlorogenic Acid, more than the dose used in the studies in which efficacy was demonstrated.

RASPBERRY KETONE:

Raspberry Ketone, a molecular constituent of Raspberries, have become a popular weight-loss additive in dietary supplements. However, the evidence for raspberry ketone as a fat-burning ingredient is extremely limited and there is actually no direct evidence the ingredient is effective in oral, supplemental doses. In vitro studies using very high concentrations have shown positive results, but human studies are non-existent.

The only human study that exists grouped RK in with several other popular weight loss ingredients so the effects cannot be attributed to raspberry ketone. Even in rat studies, RK fail to show any significant fat-burning effects. The overall consensus of the scientific community is that raspberry ketone are nothing more than industry hype.

7-KETO DHEA:

7-Keto DHEA is a non-hormonal metabolite of DHEA, lower levels of which have been noted in non-obese males as opposed to obese males, and it is alleged that 7-Keto levels are negatively correlated with obesity.

A 2000 study found that 200mg 7-Keto given to subjects who were on a calorie restricted diet resulted in more weight loss than the placebo group (consuming the same diet) over an 8 week period.

A 2007 study, published in “The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry”, found that 200mg of 7-keto DHEA raised the metabolic rate of subjects on a calorie restricted diet by 1.4%, whereas the placebo group experienced a 3.9% reduction in metabolic rate (the normal reaction to calorie restriction). However the length of this particular study was only 7 days, not long enough to measure weight loss, though this provides a likely mechanism of action for the first (2000) study.

Other studies have noted similar results but have included 7-Keto along several other ingredients, so definite conclusions cannot be drawn from those. Overall though, it appears 7-Keto may definitely be able to play a role in longterm weight-loss.

GREEN TEA EXTRACT:

Multiple studies have confirmed Green Tea Extract appears to be able to induce fat-loss. Although this effect was originally thought to be related to caffeine content, more recent research has pointed to a green tea catechin known as Epigallocatechin gallate as the compound primarily responsible for these effects.

Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is an antioxidant found in green tea, and is a member of the group of antioxidants known as catechins. In addition to these antioxidant properties, EGCG has demonstrated the ability to induce fat–loss when combined with caffeine, more than just caffeine alone. EGCG works synergistically with caffeine in regards to its effect on noradrenaline. Caffeine boosts noradrenaline while EGCG inhibits catechol-o-methyl transferase (COMT), the enzyme responsible for the degredation of noradrenaline.

So, caffeine increases noradrenaline, while EGCG prevents its breakdown, the net effect of which is increased levels of noradrenaline (which induces the breakdown of fat). Although caffeine is generally used along-side EGCG to induce catecholamine release, EGCG can be synergistic with endogenously produced catcholamines (from exercise) as well as other fat burning compounds that release catecholamines.

However, EvoLean contains just 24mg EGCG compared to the minimum of 90mg shown to be effective in studies. Furthermore, without the presence of some sort of catcholamine releasing compound, the degree of efficacy relies entirely upon exercise-induced catecholamine release, which may vary drastically.

THE BOTTOM LINE:

Aside from Raspberry Ketone, all the ingredients in EvoLean have demonstrated varying degrees of efficacy regarding weight-loss in humans. The formula contains the highest dose of Green Coffee Extract we have seen in any weight-loss supplement which, in combination with 7-Keto and EGCG may result in weight loss, assuming diet and exercise is part of the regimen. At about $3/serving EvoLean is certainly on the expensive side, especially when taking into consideration a relative reconstruction cost of around $1. EvoLean is not likely to produce any of the side-effects generally associated with more stimulant-based weight loss supplements such as anxiety, sleeplessness, etc.

REFERENCES
  1. Thielecke, Frank, et al. “Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and postprandial fat oxidation in overweight/obese male volunteers: a pilot study.” European journal of clinical nutrition 64.7 (2010): 704-713.
  2. Lu, Hong, Xiaofeng Meng, and Chung S. Yang. “Enzymology of methylation of tea catechins and inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase by (−)-epigallocatechin gallate.” Drug metabolism and disposition 31.5 (2003): 572-579.
  3. Keränen, Tapani, et al. “Inhibition of soluble catechol-O-methyltransferase and single-dose pharmacokinetics after oral and intravenous administration of entacapone.” European journal of clinical pharmacology 46.2 (1994): 151-157.
  4. Brown, A. L., et al. “Health effects of green tea catechins in overweight and obese men: a randomised controlled cross-over trial.” British Journal of Nutrition106.12 (2011): 1880-1889.
  5. Kaiman, Douglas S., et al. “A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone in healthy overweight adults.”Current therapeutic research 61.7 (2000): 435-442.
  6. Zenk, John L., Joy L. Frestedt, and Michael A. Kuskowski. “HUM5007, a novel combination of thermogenic compounds, and 3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone: each increases the resting metabolic rate of overweight adults.” The Journal of nutritional biochemistry 18.9 (2007): 629-634.
  7. Sedláčková, B., et al. “7-oxygenated derivatives of dehydroepiandrosterone and obesity.” Prague Med Rep 113 (2012): 147-155.
  8. Watanabe, Takuya, et al. “The blood pressure-lowering effect and safety of chlorogenic acid from green coffee bean extract in essential hypertension.”Clinical and experimental hypertension 28.5 (2006): 439-449.
  9. Thom, E. “The effect of chlorogenic acid enriched coffee on glucose absorption in healthy volunteers and its effect on body mass when used long-term in overweight and obese people.” Journal of International Medical Research 35.6 (2007): 900-908.
  10. Vinson, Joe A., Bryan R. Burnham, and Mysore V. Nagendran. “Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, linear dose, crossover study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a green coffee bean extract in overweight subjects.”Diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity: targets and therapy 5 (2012): 21.
  11. Wang, Lili, Xianjun Meng, and Fengqing Zhang. “Raspberry ketone protects rats fed high-fat diets against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.” Journal of medicinal food 15.5 (2012): 495-503.
  12. Park, Kyoung Sik. “Raspberry ketone increases both lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.” Planta medica 76.15 (2010): 1654.
  13. Morimoto, Chie, et al. “Anti-obese action of raspberry ketone.” Life sciences77.2 (2005): 194-204.

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