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EVLution Nutrition EVL Test Review

EVL Test is EVLution Nutrition’s test-booster which contains just four key ingredients…

EVL Test

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D-Aspartic Acid

D-Aspartic Acid has become extremely popular as a Test-booster in recent years, with research suggesting it is indeed effective, at least in the short term.

A 2012 study from “Advances in Sexual Medicine”, the subjects of which were infertile men (initially low Testosterone) found that 2.66g of D-Aspartic Acid was able to significantly increase Testosterone levels when measured after 90 days of supplementation. These results were in-line with those of an earlier study from 2009 in which D-Aspartic Acid supplementation raised Testosterone by 42% after 12 days in healthy men (initially normal Testosterone).

However, a 2013 study published in “Nutrition Research” found that athletes who supplemented with D-Aspartic Acid for 28 days showed no difference in testosterone levels.

The researchers in the failed study noted abnormally high levels of D-Aspartate Oxidase, the enzyme which degrades D-Aspartic Acid, indicating that prolonged supplementation in individuals with healthy Testosterone levels may cause “negative feedback”.

In the context of EVL Test, D-Aspartic Acid may serve as a means of increasing Testosterone in the short-term, but this short-term boost is likely to fade in individuals with initially healthy Testosterone levels.

Tribulus

Tribulus has a well-documented history of use as an aphrodisiac and overall vitality booster, but as a Testosterone booster it has failed to live up to the hype.

A 2005 study, published in the “Journal of Ethnopharamcology” found that 200mg daily (60% saponin content) had no effect on Testosterone in healthy men.

These results were replicated in a 2007 study in which 450mg of Tribulus extract daily failed to influence Testosterone levels in male athletes.

Even a 2012 study, this time testing the effects of 6g of Tribulus extract on infertile men, found a less than significant trend towards increased Testosterone.

The research is pretty clear about Tribulus: it won’t boost your Testosterone levels beyond the normal range. It may enhance libido, mimicking the partial effects of increased Testosterone, but will not induce Testosterone-like gains in strength and lean mass. EVL Test contains 750mg of Tribulus which has become a sort of industry standard (the term “clinical dose” doesn’t really apply here).

Fenugreek

Fenugreek has become one of the most popular “natural” Testosterone-boosters out there, so we had a feeling we’d end up seeing it in the EVL Test formula. While Fenugreek (as Testofen) has demonstrated the ability to increase Testosterone in one study, it has failed to do so elsewhere under similar conditions. We discuss Fenugreek and its effects on Testosterone in depth in this article.

At this time, the reason for the discrepancy is unknown. So, as a Test-booster, the reliability of Fenugreek should be questioned. Like Tribulus, Fenugreek is an effective libido enhancer and may provide the illusion of increased Testosterone regardless of whether an actual increase occurs. EVL Test contains 500mg, yielding 250mg saponins (bioactives), which is actually a clinical dose.

DIM

Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a byproduct created during the digestion of Indole-3-Carbinol, a compound found in vegetables like Broccoli which is also pretty common in test-boosters these days.

A 2011 pilot study found that, when given to human subjects at a dose of 300mg daily for 14 days, DIM produced anti-estrogenic effects.

Under different circumstances, however, DIM has shown the opposite, meaning it actually has the capacity to increase Estrogen.

How is this possibly? Well, it’s important to understand that the word “Estrogen” is actually an umbrella term which encompasses several different compounds. Some of these compounds tend to induce more “Estrogenic” effects than others, even though they are all considered “Estrogens”.

DIM appears to increase the level of 2-hydroxyestrogens (“weak Estrogen”), relative to the other types, 16a-hydroxyestrogens and 4-hydroxyestrogens (“strong Estrogens”), the result of which is less of an “estrogen-like” effect, even though total Estrogen (strong and weak) may technically be staying the same.

EVL Test contains another industry standard dose of 250mg DIM, just short of a technically clinical dose of 300mg.

The Bottom Line

EVL Test definitely has what it takes to encourage a favorable hormonal environment although how much it will actually increase Testosterone depends on the individuals initial Testosterone levels (i.e. low vs. high). The formula does contain clinical doses of key ingredients, so assuming it’s priced similar to competing products, EVL Test is a pretty solid option.

Still don’t know which Test-Booster is right for you?  Take a look at our Best Tesosterone Boosters List!

REFERENCES
  1. D’Aniello, Gemma, et al. “d-Aspartate, a key element for the improvement of sperm quality.” Advances in Sexual Medicine 2 (2012): 45.
  2. Topo, Enza, et al. “The role and molecular mechanism of D-aspartic acid in the release and synthesis of LH and testosterone in humans and rats.” Reprod Biol Endocrinol 7.120 (2009): 6.
  3. Willoughby, Darryn S., and Brian Leutholtz. “d-Aspartic acid supplementation combined with 28 days of heavy resistance training has no effect on body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in resistance-trained men.” Nutrition Research 33.10 (2013): 803-810.
  4. D’Aniello, Autimo, Anna Di Cosmo, Carlo Di Cristo, Lucio Annunziato, Leonard Petrucelli, and George Fisher. “Involvement of D-Aspartic Acid in the Synthesis of Testosterone in Rat Testes.” Life Sciences 59.2 (1996): 97-104.
  5. Rogerson, Shane, et al. “The effect of five weeks of Tribulus terrestris supplementation on muscle strength and body composition during preseason training in elite rugby league players.” The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 21.2 (2007): 348-353.
  6. Sellandi, Thirunavukkarasu M., Anup B. Thakar, and Madhav Singh Baghel. “Clinical study of Tribulus terrestris Linn. in Oligozoospermia: A double blind study.” Ayu 33.3 (2012): 356.
  7. Gauthaman, Kalamegam, and Adaikan P. Ganesan. “The hormonal effects of< i> Tribulus terrestris and its role in the management of male erectile dysfunction–an evaluation using primates, rabbit and rat.” Phytomedicine 15.1 (2008): 44-54.
  8. Gauthaman, K., P. G. Adaikan, and R. N. V. Prasad. “Aphrodisiac properties of< i> Tribulus Terrestris extract (Protodioscin) in normal and castrated rats.” Life Sciences 71.12 (2002): 1385-1396.
  9. Martino-Andrade, Anderson J., et al. “Effects of< i> Tribulus terrestris on endocrine sensitive organs in male and female Wistar rats.” Journal of ethnopharmacology 127.1 (2010): 165-170.
  10. Neychev, Vladimir Kostadinov, and Vanyo Ivano Mitev. “The aphrodisiac herb< i> Tribulus terrestris does not influence the androgen production in young men.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 101.1 (2005): 319-323. 1
  11. Steels, Elizabeth, Amanda Rao, and Luis Vitetta. “Physiological Aspects of Male Libido Enhanced by Standardized Trigonella foenum‐graecum Extract and Mineral Formulation.” Phytotherapy Research 25.9 (2011): 1294-1300.
  12. Swerdloff, Ronald S., and Christina Wang. “Dihydrotestosterone: a rationale for its use as a non-aromatizable androgen replacement therapeutic agent.”Baillière’s clinical endocrinology and metabolism 12.3 (1998): 501-506.
  13. swar, Urmila, et al. “Effect of furostanol glycosides from Trigonella foenum‐graecum on the reproductive system of male albino rats.” Phytotherapy Research 24.10 (2010): 1482-1488.
  14. Wilborn C, et al. Effects of a purported aromatase and 5α-reductase inhibitor on hormone profiles in college-age men. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. (2010)
  15. Ly, Lam P., et al. “A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of transdermal dihydrotestosterone gel on muscular strength, mobility, and quality of life in older men with partial androgen deficiency.” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 86.9 (2001): 4078-4088.
  16. Bushey, Brandon, et al. “Fenugreek Extract Supplementation Has No effect on the Hormonal Profile of Resitance-Trained Males.” International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Proceedings. Vol. 2. No. 1. 2009.
  17. Rajoria, Shilpi, et al. “3, 3′-Diindolylmethane Modulates Estrogen Metabolism in Patients with Thyroid Proliferative Disease: A Pilot Study.” Thyroid 21.3 (2011): 299-304.
  18. Hong, Chibo, Gary L. Firestone, and Leonard F. Bjeldanes. “Bcl-2 family-mediated apoptotic effects of 3, 3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) in human breast cancer cells.” Biochemical pharmacology 63.6 (2002): 1085-1097.

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